Ecosystem management and management plans

We undertake studies pertaining to the sustainable use and management of estuaries, coastal systems, protected areas and range lands. We devise workable action plans, starting from a situation assessment and consultation with stakeholders to devising ecologically, socially and economically sound strategies for achieving desired objectives.  We also produce environmental management plans to assist industry in mitigating the potential impacts of development and in meeting their environmental policy objectives.

Project Profiles

Rangeland management in the Lesotho Highlands

Rangeland management in the Lesotho Highlands
Lesotho Highlands Development Authority (LHDA)
Lesotho

Katse and Mohale Dams were constructed in the Lesotho Highlands as part of the Lesotho Highlands Water Project (LHWP), and are managed by the Lesotho Highlands Development Authority (LHDA). Both of these dam catchment areas have become increasingly populated and past monitoring efforts suggest that a large proportion of the catchment’s wetlands have become degraded, largely as a result of grazing activities.  The degradation of the catchment and wetland systems not only undermine the livelihoods of those directly dependent upon them but pose a threat to the water delivery and conservation mandates of the LHDA. The LHDA thus commissioned the “Development of the LHWP Wetlands Conservation Strategy and Monitoring Plan”. The overall aims of the study are to extend the number of wetlands assessed in the catchment areas, and to develop a wetland conservation strategy.  he study included the development of a strategy to address the threat posed by grazing to wetlands, on the basis of a review of existing information and consultation with stakeholders in the catchment area.  The study also included a component analysing different incentives for improved land management within the catchment and tested the likely success of such measures through stakeholder engagements

The sixth country report to the Convention on Biological Diversity

he sixth country report to the Convention on Biological Diversity
South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI)
South Africa

South Africa, as a party to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), is mandated to report on measures which it has taken to implement the Convention and the effectiveness of measures in meeting the objectives of the Convention. Anchor was responsible for coordinating inputs for, and compiling South Africa’s 6th country report for submission to the CBD. Working closely with SANBI and DEA, we coordinated and analysed inputs from a wide range of biodiversity stakeholders on progress towards CBD targets, liaised through the CBD National Focal Point with officials responsible for national reporting within the CBD Secretariat, coordinated the draft report review process and generated the final report.

Feasibility and design of a market-based certification scheme for the wildlife sector

Investigation into the potential feasibility and design of a market-based certification scheme for the wildlife sector of South Africa
UNDP for Department of Environmental Affairs
South Africa

This study was commissioned by the UNDP on behalf of the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA), the private wildlife sector and civil society to investigate the potential feasibility and design of a sector-specific, voluntary, market-based certification scheme for the wildlife sector of South Africa. The South African wildlife industry has over the past few decades been largely compatible with conserving biodiversity, but while many game ranches do still make a significant contribution to the protection of habitat and wildlife, a recent shift towards more intensive game ranching practices has had some negative consequences. The intensification of the sector has eroded some of the conservation benefits, through increases in fencing, higher stocking densities, increases in exotic species and selective breeding practices.  It has been recognised that wildlife ranchers need counter-incentives in order to reduce and hopefully reverse the trend for intensification and, in so doing, improve their contribution to biodiversity conservation and help to restore the wildlife and tourism sectors’ reputation in the international community.  Using regular survey methods and a choice experiment we investigated rancher preferences and the level of indirect cost to farmers of complying with specific design aspects of a potential certification scheme.  From this the potential feasibility and a recommended design of a certification scheme for the wildlife sector was presented for further investigation in the next phase of the study.

High level estimate of return on investment and priority interventions for the Greater Cape Town Water Fund

High level estimate of return on investment and priority interventions for the Greater Cape Town Water Fund
The Nature Conservancy
South Africa

This study was commissioned by The Nature Conservancy to provide information to stakeholders and funders of the Greater Cape Town Water Fund on the context and rationale for clearing invasive alien plants in order to improve the security of Cape Town’s water supply, and to communicate a strategy for doing so in the most efficient possible way. The study focused on where clearing of invasive alien plants (IAPs) would have the greatest return on investment, and identified the priority areas for clearing. This was carried out by mapping IAP densities across the catchments, modelling their impacts on water supply and modelling the cost of removal in order to create a spatial return on investment layer (m3/R invested).  This layer was used to prioritise where investment in clearing should be focused.Information about where major stakeholders are already clearing IAPs was also collated and mapped to help inform an integrated water resource management approach to IAP clearing within the catchment areas. In addition, this study also examined how catchment restoration in terms of IAP clearing compared to other alternative water supply interventions in terms of costs and co-benefits.  The study was further extended to include a business case for wetland restoration and the removal of plantations in catchment areas.

https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2018-07-02-clearing-thirsty-alien-trees-will-yield-water-returns-for-cape-town/

https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2019-01-15-clearing-thirsty-alien-vegetation-set-to-bring-cheapest-solution-to-cape-towns-water-crisis/

Incentives for sustainable practices and conservation in Namibia’s freehold rangelands

Incentives for sustainable practices and conservation in Namibia’s freehold rangelands
GiZ, through NNF
Namibia

The fourth volume of the Namibia TEEB Study aimed to understand the proximate and root causes of observed rangeland degradation in Namibia in more recent decades, and based on this, identify feasible options to incentivise biodiversity-friendly, sustainable rangeland management practices on all types of freehold rangelands. The study was based on a desktop review, discussions with key informants, farm visits and a stakeholder workshop.  From this, a set of ten recommendations were made to incentivise conservation on freehold land.

Livestock Predation and its Management in South Africa: A Scientific Assessment

Livestock Predation and its Management in South Africa: A Scientific Assessment
South Africa

Livestock predation occurs in nearly all rangelands around the world, and usually leads to some level of investment in predator control in order to minimise economic losses. These measures are often controversial due to uncertainty about their effectiveness and concerns about their impacts on animal welfare, biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and populations of endangered species. This study investigated the socio-economic impacts of livestock predation and its prevention in South Africa.